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cliff and tonight, a c.i.a. bombshell. victory and fallout, tonight on "washington week." the lines were long. the victory party was robust. >> a long campaign is now over. and whether i earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you. and you've made me a better president. gwen: a the thank yous were fervert. >> i'm really proud of all of you. it will go on in history. people will read about it it. and they'll marvel about it. >> as president obama claimed his second term. the election turned out to be a lesson in truth and consequences. what did the obama campaign do right and what did the romney campaign do wrong? >> and i ran for office because i'm concerned about americans. this election is over. but our principles endure. >> the voters have their say. leaving washington to search for a compromise even as a fiscal crisis looms. >> this is an opportunity for the president to lead. this is his. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. gwen: here to cover another historic week dan balz of "the washington p
cliff, we examine the gauntlet's being thrown down tonight on "washington week." >> i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do. gwen: at the white house today, talk of compromise. >> it's going to be incumbent on my colleagues to show the american people that we're serious about cutting spending and solving our fiscal dilemma. >> we have the cornerstones of being able to work something out. gwen: but the post-election sparks are flying everywhere else. distinguished generals under fire, accused of inappropriate behavior. >> it was a very sad situation to have a distinguished career like that end in this manner. gwen: lawmakers pledging to get to the bottom of the benghazi attacks draw lines in the sand. >> we will do whatever is necessary to block the nomination that's within our power as far as susan rice is concerned. gwen: and the president pushes back. >> for them to go after the u.n. ambassador and to besmirch her reputation is outrageous. gwen: and mitt romney stirs intraparty recrimination with this post-election analysis. >> it's a proven political strateg
washington turn its back on the broad middle class to favor a relatively few at the top in democracy? >> well, what has relreally changed is the organization of the american politics particularly the organizations that representative the deepest pocketed members of american spoipt what we've seen is an organizational revolution over the last 30 years that has meant that business and wall street and ideological conservative organizations that are pushing for free market policies have all become much more influential. and at the same time a lot of organizations that once represented the middle class, labor unions, broadbased civic organizations and sort of organizations at the local and the grassroots level, including social movements, have all lost enormous ground. and so it's that imbalance, that shift, that i think this sort of underlying pressure that playless out in our politics today. the way we describe it in the book as as if the ecosystem of american politics has changed. and everyone in american politics and democrats republicans, liberals, conservatives has had to adapt to this new w
. what can we do for you? >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i'm kathy kay. armed with new job numbers and old attack lines, the two candidates for president begin their final pitches. the new york marathon cancelled amid suffering after sandy. residents of staten island say they've been forgotten. >> this is new york city, the financial capital of the world. putting right what's happened here is going to take many months and maybe longer. >> and getting ready for new leaders in china. tonight we continue our series of special reports on the challenges they'll face. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. with just four days to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now starts the weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the r
. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> wherever it goes, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see danger before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who serve. that's why we're here. >> corporate funding is also provided by prudential financial. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. no one got the chance to catch a post-election breath here in washington before all heck broke loose. filibuster threats, sex scandals, intraparty finger pointing
from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: it was fres
. will either candidate's plan actually work? from the pbs newshour, frontline, washington week, and need to know, this is "election 2012: what's at stake." >> announcer: from the tisch wnet studios in new york, hari sreenivasan. >> thanks for joining us. tonight we are going to do something different. combining the resources of pbs's news and public affairs programs, we are going to look beyond election day and examine how barack obama and mitt romney plan to fix some of america's most serious problems. the stakes could not be much higher. nearly five years after the start of the great recession, more than 20 million americans are unemployed or under-employed. the national debt has soared 16 trillion dollars. and our ability to fund medicare is in doubt. tens of millions of americans still don't have medical insurance. and the nation faces challenges around the world -- from the middle east to china. later in the broadcast jeffrey brown of the pbs newshour will look at some critical issues all but been ignored during the campaign. frontline will examine key moments that shaped both candi
." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. the scam which brought down the c.i.a. director spread further. now it is the actions of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan called into question. failing its mandate, the bbc gains access into an internal report showing the united nations failed to protect civilians in sri lanka. >> they left actually at the moment the population needed them more than ever. the government wanted them out of the way essentially because they didn't want anyone to see what was happening. >> running the world in just a week. a marathon man on a mission that boo leave most of us in the dust. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. bizarre. it is the only way to describe the scandal that has already claimed the job of the c.i.a. director and now has america's top commander in afghanistan under investigation. both are strange enough, but how do you explain the addition of a shirtless f.b.i. agent and 30,000 e-mails. here is the latest. >> it is a washington drama with a stellar cast. the spy chief, the top general a
of people who have written and thought hard about the choices ahead. from washington, d.c., tom friedman, he is a columnist in for the times and cocoauthor of "that used to be us, how america fell behind in the world it e invented" and david brooks of the "new york times," he is the author of "the social animal." joining me in new york, tom brokaw, a special correspondent for nbc news and the author of "the time of our lives" a conversation about america. and jon meacham, the executive editor of random house and the author of the forthcoming book "thomas jefferson, the art of power." finally joining us, amy gutman, president of the university of pennsylvania and chair of the president's commission on bioethics and the coauthor of "the spirit of compromise" why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it. i'm pleased to have each of them here for this conversation. we obviously don't know who the new president is and we come forward with the premise that whoever it is, these are the issues and the choices and the challenges that face him. i'll start with you. what is it this new presid
washington d.c., davidic nake a column else for "the washington post" and martha raddatz a senior affairs correspondent with abc news. two cbs colleagues, norah o'donnell my cohost and john miller correspondent at cbs news who is frequently with me on cbs this morning. i'm please to do have all of them here. we'll be joined by norah and john in just a moment. martha tell me about general petraeus. do you know him. what is it about this story that surprises you most? >> well, i have known general petraeus and covered him in war zones for about a decade and what surprised me most is he seems like a man who is so disciplined and so careful about his image and about his reputation that it was jaw dropping to me when i first heard it. >> rose: so the question is what didn't you understand about him? >> well, i mean i may not understand everything about him now but i was surprised that he would allow this i guess failure of discipline. he really does guard his reputation so well. he watch the people who are around him. but he granted paula broadwell this unprecedent the act sessments we've ha
outward from the pentagon today, and across official washington. the name of u.s. marine general john allen, the top american commander in afghanistan, surfaced overnight in the scandal that began friday with david petraeus resigning at c.i.a. director. unnamed defense officials say the military is now investigating possibly, quote, inappropriate communications between allen and tampa socialite jill kelley. she had reported getting harassing emails from another woman, paula broadwell. the f.b.i. investigation that followed uncovered broadwell's affair with petraeus. but according to the newest revelations, agents also found extensive contacts between kelley and general allen. the f.b.i. notifieded the pentagon on sunday. last night spokesman george little read a statement from defense secretary leon panetta on a flight to australia. >> today the secretary directed that the matter be referred to the inspector general of the department of defense for investigation. it is now in the hands of the department of the secretary-general. >> brown: early news accounts said allen and kelley exch
with republican leaders get underway to avoid the fiscal cliff. as darren gersh reports from washington, even before republicans and democrats sit down to talk on friday, both sides are laying down markers. >> reporter: just two days before he meets with congressional leaders, the president took a tougher tone on budget talks. in his news conference, he pushed hard for an immediate extension of tax cuts for everyone making less than $250,000 a year. >> and by the way, that means every american, including the wealthiest americans get a tax cut. it means that 98% of all americans, and 97% of all small businesses won't see their taxes go up a single dime. the senate has already passed a law like this. democrats in the house are ready to pass a law like this and i hope republicans in the house come on board too. >> reporter: republicans said again they would be willing to raise more tax revenue by closing loopholes or limiting deductions. but those revenues had to be matched with cuts in entitlement programs. >> until you make our entitlement programs fit the future demographic of country, the de
: in washington, they think carefully about the pictures they want to present to the public so this mattered. all four congressional leaders-- democrats and republicans-- after meeting with the president chose to face the cameras together. that hardly ever happens and it reflects the new post-election mood of cooperation. house speaker john boehner called the meeting very constructive. >> i outlined a framework that deals with reforming our tax code and reforming our spending. and i believe the framework that i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's call for a fair and balanced approach. >> reporter: to republican leaders balance means some higher tax revenues are paired with reductions in spending and changes in entitlement programs. that's a challenge for democrats, but the president seemed willing to move in that direction. >> our challenge is to make sure that we are able to cooperate together, work together, find some common ground, make some tough compromises, build some consensus to do the peoples business. and what folks are looking for-- and i think all of us
the last weekend. what happens when all of the ads stop? tonight on "washington week." >> four more years! four more years! four more years! gwen: the candidate's final pitch. who really owns hope and change? >> the question of this election comes down to this -- do you want more of the same or do you want real change and we want real change. >> we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering ain't it. gwen: the polls can't predict it. the crowds can't guarantee it and even the early voters can't. >> it ended in the great recession of 2008. >> we know what this movie looks like at the end of the movie. turn on the tv and look at europe. >> a toss-up election, complete with its own october surprise. unpredictable, political embraces. >> if they need something, we figure out a way to say yes. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and for the people of our state. gwen: then today, 171,000 new jobs adds to mostly good economic news. now, it's up to you. covering the week jackie comes of the "new york times." john harwood
, sending shock waves through washington. and on the political front, it is back to business. can the parties to strike a deal to reverse the looming economic difficulties? a new teen-age magician in town is making quite a market in south africa. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it was a rather unexpected resignation. a short time ago, general david is stepping down as cia director. president obama accepted the resignation of the retired four- star general. he praised his outstanding service. michael, how much of a shock was this? >> it was pretty much a surprise, the general, as far as i know, was very well-thought of at the agency. certainly a defender of the agency and several weeks ago, he made it very clear after the attack that no one at the agency prevented assistance going to the man going under attack. it was the white house -- >> the resignation comes just ahead of hearing about been gauzy. >> it is a very peculiar thing, he was scheduled to testify under oath next thursday, with other people from the intelligence community abo
's measured in achievement. >> warner: in fairfax an independent voter rich suburb of washington d.c. >> so many of you look at the big debates in this country not as a republican or a democrat but as an independent thinker, as an american. and you watch what's happened to this country over the last four years with an independent voice you hope that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together. to solve big problems. he hasn't. i will. ( cheers and applause ) >> warner: in late afternoon he rallieded supporters in columbus, the capital of all important ohio. >> we feel good about the nature of the race. i think we're going to win ohio >> warner: do you see a path to victory without winning ohio >> there are numerous paths to victory to get to 270. but like anyone else, we'd rather get there with ohio than without it >> warner: ohio so crucial that romney's running mate paul ryan was there today to too. on the heels of stops in nevada, colorado, and iowa. romney's day won't end until midnight after an election eve rally in manchester, new hampshire. >> woodruff: late
, "bbc world news." >> this is a special edition of bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. president obama joins campaign workers to dial up support in the final hours. >> we feel we have the votes to win. >> his rival, mitt romney is off to the polls, and then bet -- back to the campaign trail for one final push. >> we are going to steer this country back on to a course that will help the american people have a brighter future. >> and taking a spin back in time, tonight, we will show you how the competitors have stacked up over the years. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere are around the globe. election day is finally here and across the huge country, people are finally casting their ballots. today, neither candidate was taking any chances, mounted a last-minute effort to get us support at the polls. -- to get the best support at the polls. >> this is america, a democracy. this is what it is all about. >> will he stay in power for another four years or be rejected after one term? the president is checking to make sure there i
&p was up a fraction. american businesses are not only concerned about the fiscal showdown in washington, but also about corporate earnings. nearly all of the s&p 500 firms have reported numbers, and profit growth is the slowest since the recession in 2009. and the majority of firms are also reporting disappointing revenues. here's erika miller with a look back at the quarter, and a look ahead. >> reporter: earnings season is drawing to a close. and for many firms it's good riddance. nearly all of the s&p 500 have reported quarterly numbers, and according to s&p capital i.q., profits are up a measly 2%. thomson reuters and factset crunch the numbers slightly differently, and believe profits are actually down. the bigger concern is revenue growth. s&p has the most optimistic analysis with a 0.6% gain. the other two firms see negative growth. firms face an almost universal problem: a slowing global economy. >> companies kind of put it in this context: the red flag is europe still. china falling there after, being kind of a yellow flag. >> reporter: that weak global demand is forcing many c
as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. produced in association with national journal. corporate funding is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see danger before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who serve. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management from real estate to retirement solutions. we developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. >> this rock has never stood still. and that's one thing that will never change, prudential. >> additional corporate funding is provided by norfolk southern. additional funding is provided by the annenburg foundation. public broadcasting and contributions to your pbs station fr
of the blue thunder bolt that hit washington friday. >> brown: all weekend in washington the details kept coming along with more questions. after david petraeus' sudden resignation on friday because he had had an extra marital affair quickly revealed to involve his biographer paula broadwell. her book came out last january. appearing on c-span she recalled first meeting petraeus several years earlier. >> he came to harvard university where i was a graduate student and wanted to speak to students about the merits of counterinsurgency approach to fighting the iraq war. >> brown: later researching her book broadwell had extensive access to petraeus during his time as overall commander in afghanistan. in august of last year, wife holy at his side the four-star general retired from the service. he took the c.i.a. post the next month. today the general's former spokesman retired colonel steve boylan told abc the affair began then, after he had left the army which strictly for bids adultery. >> this all started about two months after he was in the c.i.a. as the director and just so you know it a
with washington. what the president and what washington in general can do is try to set the stage and set a groundwork for policy that could encourage growth. and i think the shorter term that you are thinking about, the less can be done specifically by the president. so if you are asking over a one month or three month period, there's very little the president can do. if you start asking over a five year, ten year period, then the policy decisions they make can influence quite a lot the way things go. >> brown: and john taylor, brief last word on that? >> well, i think as we are talking about four years what is going to happen the next four years. that say time where a president can make a tremendous difference. and we're talking about the past four years. and the president could have made a much better policy with the unemployment being so high. >> brown: all right, john taylor and austan goolsbee, thanks so much. >> thank you >> brown: and if you're ready for more analysis on the jobs numbers, you'll find it, as always, on paul solman's "making sense" page online. >> woodruff: still to
by the storm. >> rose: we turn to an interview we taped earlier this week with the actor denzel washington. and director bob zemeckis. >> it all comes down to the script for me. when i read a screen play that i can't put down, and when i read a screen play that's unique and really well written and complex, i feel it's worthy to do. and then i heard that denzel was interested in doing it, and when iwhen i read the screen play it was like he was perfect for the part. so i called him up and said, are you really interested in this?" and he said, "year, i am." >> number one is the screen play. as they say, if it's not on the page it's not on the stage. as bob said, when you get a hold of something, when you read something that just grabs you-- and it's very rare that that happens for me, anyway, where you just it's a page turner and it's complex and it's interesting and it's something i hadn't done before. it's an easy decision. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the former chair of the f.d.i.c., sheila bair. >> my view is that, look, we had a crisis in 2008. but in 2009, we had a stable sy
melham, washington bureau chief for al- arabiya; and dan schueftan is director of national security studies center at the university of haifa. gentlemen, one thing i think a lot of people, myself included are wondering how did this flare-up seemingly so quickly. dan schueftan. >> well, since hamas took over we had for a while a thousand rockets per year, then came israeli escalation and-- and it went down to a small number of rockets every year, last year again we came to about a thousand rockets against israel. and this intensified in recent weeks to the point where israel had to take action. israel was saying for about two weeks, i mean people here were dealing with the elections and other things. but it was saying it must lead to a point where either it stops or we will have to take action. when it didn't stop israel took action. >> brown: what do you think happened to build telephone up? >> we have never seen quiet on the border even from 2008 until now. and a few days leading to the israeli decision to take on, assassinate a major military leader of hamas there were skirmishes
. a trial in that case is scheduled to begin in february. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: joining us now, mitchell crusto. he's a law professor at loyola university in new orleans, and has been studying the b.p. case and the relationship between business and the environment. how important is today's set element -- settlement. >> this is the biggest story.no. we have more dollars at stake. >> in terms of how importantthil us a little more. it's a record settlement. but it does encompass quite a few different features. in addition to the felony charges there is the fec investigation and the resolution of that matter and that is a big deal. >> darren is saying it's notove. the government is bringing gross negligence charges against bp. bp is going to fight it vigorously how is that going to play out? >> it's difficult for them toave standard when they admitted to the felony charges. when it's related to the environment. it's some $20 billion this is a big story but it's an even bigger story ahead. >> there have been so many fines there a silver lining to all of this? does this make t
to erect, a fellow at the washington institut for near east policy. how much difference does egypt's new government make to that crucial relationship with israel? >> i think the fact you have the muslim brotherhood in power in egypt really made israel hesitant to even start this kind of operation, which is why they waited until over a cut rockets have fallen from gaza the past year. this is not an operation they wanted to begin, in large part because they knew this egypt would respond differently to the way hosni mubarak's would have. >> what about the historic peace treaty? >> for the moment, it appears that the president, a former moslem brotherhood leader, understands he cannot do anything to break the treaty. what he is doing is anything that he can that kind of stops short of breaking it. the making of strong statements against israel in support of a hamas, sending his prime minister, encouraging egyptians to go to gaza, where they effectively act as human shields because they deter israel from continuing its operation law giving hamas the cover to intensify their attacks. he is not
out a bigger plan for a grand bargain. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: while investors remain focused on the fiscal cliff, a further jump in consumer sentiment helped stocks close in the green today. the university of michigan reuters consumer sentiment index this month rose to 84.9. that's its highest level since july of 2007. the dow added four points, the nasdaq was up nine, the s&p 500 added two points. for the week overall, the dow fell 2.1%. the nasdaq dropped 2.6%. and the s&p 500 is 2.4% lower tonight compared to a week ago. >> reporter: while president obama and house speaker boehner both say they're open to new ideas, wall streeters remain cautious about the fiscal cliff. meridien equity partners' joe greco says the market doesn't expect it to be resolved this year. >> i think we're going to see a push pull back and forth and we're probably not going to see much compromise until mid to late january. if we don't get things in order by february that's when things can start to get ugly for the markets. >> reporter: with so much short- term risks, greco says retai
matters what the whole complexion of washington looks like t really comes down in many cases to who wins in the senate. do we have a gop sweep with a romney win or do you still have a democratic senate that can really change the complexion of what this lame duck lex looks like and what the status quo election may lend itself to a quick res luig of a lame duck session so a lot depends not just on the without wins the oval office but its next two years in congress looks like. >> susie: so talk us through that. let's say president o ba am a wins the election but you have republicans dominating in congress. what does that mean for the stock market. and vice versa, if romney becomes president romney and he has a democratic congress, if he has to grapple with. >> i will service its second one first, if romney has to deal with a democratic congress, really a democratic senate the house probably stays in the hands of republicans. unlikely to craft a deal in a very short amount of timement remember we've got this fiscal cliff hittin next year and a lame duck session with a lot of that needs to be
.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the long haul to bring the unemployment rate down, but slowly. >> reporter: one of the best things about this jobs report: payroll gains were broad-based. retailing added 36,000 jobs. health care 31,000 jobs. construction 17,000 jobs. manufacturing shook off its recent losses, adding 13,000 jobs. the unemployment rate did tick up to 7.9%. but even that may be a sign of strength. labor force participation had been falling as older workers retired and others gave up looking for work. over the last two months that trend has reversed and labor force participation is at its highest level in three years. >> that's a very good sign because it means job opportunities are increasing. it's drawing people in. >> reporter: wage growt
running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 and a columnist for reuters. he is also the co-author with ross douthat of the much talked-about book, "grand new party: how republicans can win the working class and save the american dream." welcome to both of you. >> great to see you, bill. >> bob, what will you remember about this election? >> well, the first t
in the evening-- this is in the collar area around the distric districf columbia around washington-- are they get anything sense from parts of virginia or any recalling state? >> warner: well, not that they're telling me, gwen. which doesn't mean they aren't, because they had this whole system set up with people at these key precincts with smart phonessably to report both who voted literally, who voted by name, who hadn't yet voted. and staying there to report preliminary returns or returns. so, you know, it may be coming into the war room, which is by the way not here at the convention center but down at what used to be called the boston garden. it's now called the t.d. garden. i have not been able to find out what they're hearing. they did have high hopes fairly early in the evening those counties in northern virginia they would have a clear sense of romney doing expwl, therefore, a very good omen for the evening. >> ifill: i'll really curious about one thing today, mitt romney spent part of his day in two cities in which he is not expected to do well, cleveland and pittsburgh, two industrial c
. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> tom: retail sales moved higher in october as retailers closed their books on the month before sandy rushed ashore. macy's surprised with a better than expected 4% sales gains; kohl's and target also fared well. warehouse store costco was up 5%, while nordstrom was the standout. the high-end retailer posting a near 10% sales gain. >> susie: and auto sales moved higher in october, despite hurricane sandy crimping sales in the final days of the month. sales at g.m. rose almost 5% on strength in its cadillac and buick brands. at ford, sales barely budged, up just four tenths of a percent. the auto maker believes the massive storm cost the industry as many as 25,000 sales in the last three days of the month. chrysler was up 10%, led by its ram pickup truck. toyota's sales were up 16%, while honda gained about half that. also from ford today, some management news that looks like a succession plan. mark fields was tapped to be chief operating officer, a move seen as steering him to eventually take the wheel from ford c.e.o. alan mulally. diane eastabro
incident you left washington and you went to nevada. that was for a fund-raiser. that's what they're doing and if you think of that many fund raisers, here's an interesting statistic for you. back in 1984, ronald reagan was incumbent president of the united states. he was running for reelection. his campaign had to raise money for the party even though he was taking the federal grant as everyone has until this year in the general election. ronald reagan attended in that year four fund raisers. >> compared to -- >> 221, so we have a president -- this is not an attack on obama. we have a president who is to some extent, not doing their job because they have to be off fund-raising. the romney people felt the same way. romney was heard to be complaining in his campaign that he couldn't go out and meet voters and do what he thought he had to do as a can at because he had to spend all of his time in closed rooms of wealthy people to fund raise in order to get his ads up for his campaign. he couldn't campaign. there's a great irony here and so you have two issues here. one is the time that the pr
stranded at home in the washington, d.c. media market on monday during the hurricane and saw a lot of these ads in the virginia race. and it was just non-stop left right left right beating each other up. many funded by the outside groups and not the candidates themselvess. >> brown: let's focus on one case, ohio, tell us what you see there in terms of campaigns versus the outside groups. >> well, especially on the republican side, the outside groups are a huge factor. the republican candidate josh mandel has been outspent 3-1 by the outside groups in support of him. so he's been hugely helped by these groups. sherrod brown, obviously, has -- as the incumbent, had the incumbent advantage in terms of the money that he has available to spend but he' also getting a lot of help from outside groups. they are flood there had in ohio and the remarkable thing is that ohio is this big presidential state. it's not like the airwaves are free and clear. >> brown: never. >> so they're having to spend a ton of money. these aren't cheap media markets and they're especially not cheap in the preside
polarizing issues in america. two states-- oregon and washington-- have legalized doctor-assisted suicide, and only for the terminally ill. but around the country, people who want help dying aren't waiting for the laws to change. instead, they've gone underground. this is a journey told from the inside, far from public view. this is the hidden world of assisted suicide. >> i'm not afraid of dying. i've always believed that death is nothing to fear. it's part of living. everybody has to do it. and i want to make sure that my death is going to be my way. >> narrator: if joan foley butterstein lived in oregon or washington, an open conversation with a doctor could allow her to end her life the way she's always lived it, on her own terms. by age 18, joan had set out on her own. she was a singer and a dancer at the latin quarter in new york city. she married tom foley, her high school sweetheart, and began her life as a marine wife. nine years later, their daughter kathleen was born. life was good. but then, after 54 years of marriage, tom got sick. >> my husband died of lung cancer. and he we
of climate change. i ask the political reporter for the "washington post" what he would be watching out for. we're entering the portion of the campaign where i start to the people who run for president just have a different team than the rest of us -- different gene than the rest of us. >> there is no doubt about that, but this is an incredibly close election at this point. a lot of people predicted this a year ago, that it would be close, and they've got the election they anticipated. a handful of states will decide if the candid -- will decide it. candidates will be in and out of the state's multiple times. >> what can they actually do at this stage? barack obama, mitt romney, to try to persuade people after two years of campaigning and, whenever it is, a couple of billion dollars in advertising have not made their minds of yet. >> as you say, there are very few persuade of all voters, but there may be some who will listen to a final argument -- there are very few persuadable voters. the second thing is they each need to have the most energized base possible, and so many of these rallies
states, not least washington, d.c., the damage was minimal. this crisis hardly matches up to 9/11. but new york is once again at the center of a national drama. and the proximity of election day only emphasizes more strongly what's at stake. >> pharmaceutical companies are piling into india. hundreds of the indians who took part have died during trials and very few autopsies have been carried out to determine the cause of death. doctors have been fined and now the independentian government is considering tightening things up. >> some locals call it neocolonialism. foreign drug companies using poor and illiterate indians as guinea pigs in drug trials. >> our family has been destroyed by this and the drug company should know it. >> the doctors who carry out the trials may be in denial. but they are now being disciplined. and lawyers are asking if we can trust the results of the trials. >> the global implication potentially would be whether those findings can be safely relied upon. >> india has obvious eye trackses to the foreign drug -- attractions to the foreign drug companies.
faced questions on the other major story in washington right now, the extra-marital affair that ended david petraeus' career as c.i.a. director. today, he said he's seen no evidence that national security was compromised. >> obviously, there's an ongoing investigation. i don't want to comment on the specifics of the investigation. the f.b.i. has its own protocols in terms of how they proceed. we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done. and my main hope right now is-- is that he and his family are able to move on and that this ends up being a single side note on what has otherwise been an extraordinary career. >> reporter: the president was pressed on whether he should have been informed sooner of the f.b.i.'s investigation. he said he was withholding judgment. >> i think you're going to have to talk to the f.b.i. in terms of what their general protocols are when it comes to what started off as a potential criminal investigation. and one of the challenges here is-- is that we're not supposed to meddle in, you know, criminal investigations. and that's been our practice
for the "washington post"; and retired army colonel peter mansoor. he was executive officer for general petraeus during the surge of forces in iraq in 2007 and 2008. he's now professor at ohio state university. greg miller, tension according to many news reports is focusing on general petraeus's biographer and the fact that the general came to the fbi's attention during an investigation. what can you tell us? >> yeah, we're hearing that too. i want to stress that this is very early in the story. so a lot of information is hard to nail down at this point. but we're being told that yes, this is not necessarily a case of the general, the former general stepping up doing the right thing and admitting to an affair but being flushed out. being forced to admit it because of an fbi investigation into e-mail access of the director's e-mail. >> suarez: e-mail access by the woman in question, paula broadwell, the author of "all in" >> right, exactly, presumably by this author who it written his biography, very glowing account of the general. and spent extensive time with the general in war zones. >> suarez
and wanted to enjoy the beautiful things in life, almost a kind of-- and james is writing washington square in 1880 looking back to 1850, himself sort of choosing that distance of 30 years to explore the changes that have been made in their society. and you know, the doctor is justified in some his suspicions of this man but in another way it's a reaction against, you know, any kind of man. >> rose: i read that you wanted to sort of explore the complexity, of in fact, of his attraction. >> well, i think there is something that recurs in james, something that james understands very, very well is that these two things aren't necessarily mutually exclusive. that you can be in love with someone and their things and their lifestyle. and i think there is a certain interpretation of morris where he comes in as a twiddling villain and is just out for the cash. and that is certainly one way of looking at him. but i think in conversation right from the beginning when i met with him, we looked at the ambiguity there and that there are some very, very attractive qualities about catherine. she is not a
'm al hunt of "bloomberg news" filling in for charlie rose from washington. we quinn if th evening with news from the white house. president obama heldaise first press conference since his reelection. he delivered a brief opening statement, emphasizing the need to avert the fiscal cliff set to take effect january 1. >> there's only one way to solve these humans and that is to do it together. as i've said before, i'm open to compromise and i'm open to new ideas and i've been encouraged the past week to hear republican after republican to agree on the need from more revenue from the wealthiest american as parent of our arithmetic if we're serious about reducing the deficit. >> the president fielded questions. the budget was the most pressing subject. obama vowed not tho extend the bush tax cuts for the top 2% of income earners. >> when it comes to the top 2%, what i'm not going to do is to extend further a tax cut for folks who don't need it, which would cost close to $1 trillion, and it's very difficult to see how you make up that trillion dollars, if we're serious about deficit red
's still at the very beginning. >> rose: cyberwarfare has a new urgency in washington as the president has --. >> as it should. >> rose: talk to me about that, as you see it. >> well, i think stucksnet, the voy russ that was used to attack the iranian centrifuges is a huge wake-up call. most people have computer viruses in their heads, they think of computer viruses as something that might mess with their data. they don't think of computer viruses as something that can destroy physical infrastructure. but in fact, almost all, you know, modern pieces of capital equipment take a electric power generation station, big turbines, natural gas powered turbine. >> they're driven by software. >> they're driven by software and to be efficient you have to take that big turbine and spin it at very high speeds. and to be really efficient you want to spin it right up to its structural limit its and no further. so you can use the software if you take control of that software to overspin the turbine and it will fly apart. it can destroy it. and so there's a lot of-- i think people are rightly awakening to
should call the congress to come back to washington d.c. and work full-time, that means at least monday through friday, taking off only national holidays, until they reach a deal in the fiscal cliff. in other words, no deal, no break. and while we have to avoid the fiscal cliff, we need to achieve a grand bargain next year so we can avoid the fiscal abyss. so the president should also congress on congress to work monday through friday every week, except for federal holidays, next year, until we have a grand bargain. it time these people started working full-time and generating results. >> susie: well, that sounds like a good way to tackle this huge problem. but what are the chances that congressional lawmakers can agree at the end of the day on some kind of solution? >> well, susie, i think we have to be realist iic, you're not going to get a so-called grand bargain in a lame duck session. there's a reason it's called lame duck. but i think what we can do is end up agreeing on not extending, for example, the 2% payroll tax cut, that saves $100 billion. potentially having some defense an
are reporting from washington. one day to go, three states to visit. president obama uses the final hours to campaign for every vote he can. >> after all we've been through together, we can't give up now. because we've got more change to do. >> his rival, mitt romney, traveled to four states to make his final pitch for a change in the white house. >> you hoped that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together and to solve problem. he hasn't. i will. >> and if you live here, the election is secondary. a week after sandy blew through in new york neighborhood, it's still waiting for help. welcome to our viewers on public television in america. and also around the globe. for those of you despairing that this presidential election has gone on far too long, good news. it's almost over. the final day of campaigning saw the candidates flying across the country in a last bid for votes. tonight we have comprehensive coverage of how the campaign looks at the very end. the bbc north american editor has been with the obama campaign in wisconsin. he starts our coverage. >> win
analyst and is now at the center for strategic and international studies, a washington think tank. so we now know the new group of leaders. any surprises in that? >> no, i don't think there were. we saw this list had been circulated, this more conservative list, circulated a couple weeks ago so it came out exactly as it had been predicted. it is unfortunate that these more reform oriented people didn't make the list but we knew in advance who was going to show up. >> brown: what does "conservative" and "reform" mean in today's china vis-a-vis the government and the party? >> it's important to emphasize these people deemed as more conservative are not somehow orthodox hard liners. these people believe in the reform process that dung chao peng launched 30 years ago. so it's a much more of a degree of reform, not which reform should be pursued. and what are we talking about is should the party be pursuing a next wave of political reform? >> brown: as to xi jinping himself he was critical of the party, talking about corruption, taking describes, being out of touch with people is that unusual
the candidates, and reaction at watch parties here in the washington, d.c., area. reporters from around the nation are contributing to our live blog, which will be updated all night. >> ifill: election day posed special challenges for the storm-ravaged sections of the northeast. still, thousands of people crowded makeshift polling places. hari sreenivasan has that story. >> sreenivasan: on hard-hit statten island, the hum of generators could be heard powering lech throne i can voting booths in tents this morning. >> i'm going to vote no matter where. >> sreenivasan: new york governor andrew cuomo issued an executive order on monday allowing displaced voters to use any polling station if they presented an affidavit. that touched off confusion today at numerous polling places. but cuomo urged people not to be discouraged. >> many of the polling places were moved. some of the polling places had issues with electricity and generators, et cetera. but it is important that we vote. it's important that the system works. this is an important election. this is a critical election, i believe. >> s
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